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Collection

Tropical Forest Restoration

Maren Schermer

Educator (NOT Journalism School)

Absorbing carbon and filtering water are just two of the many ecosystem services that tropical forests provide. Tropical forests now comprise just five percent of the world's landmass, down from 12 percent previously. However, restoration efforts are underway to reverse this trend. If these efforts continue, Project Drawdown estimates that these valuable ecosystems could sequester 54 or more gigatons of CO2 emissions by the year 2050. Their ample capacity to sequester carbon makes tropical forests a key strategy to slowing and reversing the effects of climate change. 

The stories in this collection (see below) demonstrate how people around the world are working to restore degraded tropical forests. In Malawi, using a three-pronged approach of providing water filters, planting trees, and using effective cookstoves has helped curb rapid deforestation. In Borneo, providing affordable health care removed the locals' financial need for logging and forests are making a comeback. Replanting efforts are underway in Brazil, led by a women's collective, and in Myanmar where drones are being harnessed. This solution is one of the Drawdown Ecochallenge actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

CLICK HERE TO SEE ALL THE SOLUTIONS JOURNALISM STORY COLLECTIONS RELATED TO PROJECT DRAWDOWN. 

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