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Designing the Future of Policing

created by

Lucille Crelli

Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications

We live in a time of steadily increasing gun violence and police forces that few have faith in with the recent rise in domestic terrorism, police homicides, and urban violence. Danger could lurk around city corner and even within any uniform. I live less than 2 miles from the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and I now know people personally affected by gun violence. As a result, I naturally expect more from the people tasked with protecting our right to live free from violence. 

This collection was borne out of a desire to examine the effect of human-centered design on how that right is protected, but also as a source of comfort to know that challenges are not taken lightly. The breadth and reach of human rights are constantly shifting and redefining, especially during the Digital Age, and as a result policing to protect those rights should also be able to redesign its practice as needed. The following articles cover solutions that were designed with behavioral economics and psychology in mind while still keeping the human firmly centered in its process. 

The first article, set in Newburgh, New York, mentions my hometown directly when talking about cities that have implemented a tactic called Ceasefire, a proactive measure that uses “focused deterrence” to send messages of anti-violence from mothers, pastors, and youth leaders to targeted dangerous individuals. The city of Los Angeles enacts implicit bias training for police forces and backs up their teachings with documentation of hard numbers that prove to officers the bias involved in police violence. Minneapolis is taking a deep breath and studying de-escalation tactics, which oftentimes merely requires a waiting period and lack of weapons to diffuse a situation. Lastly, police across the US and UK strategize to recruit a more diverse workforce by rearranging, rewording, and redistributing their recruitment materials. The subjects of these four articles all utilize design-thinking — whether through graphic designers or behavioral psychologists — and all mark a distinct shift in how we protect our right to live free from violence. 

Stories In This Collection (4)

Taking Aim at Gun Violence, With Personal Deterrence

Taking Aim at Gun Violence, With Personal Deter...
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How to Reduce Police Violence

How to Reduce Police Violence
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What cops aren't learning

What cops aren't learning
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A simple combination of data and language tweaks is helping recruit more diverse police officers

A simple combination of data and language tweak...
view story
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Your information will be used to better support and enable your membership. We care about your privacy and, in accordance with GDPR regulations, request your consent before giving you access to the membership services described above. You will also receive customized communications tailored to your interests as described by your selections. We will never sell your information to 3rd parties. You can cancel your membership and change your communications preferences at any time, though this may prevent you from participating in the opportunities provided by this program. View our full privacy policy here. By clicking submit, you accept these terms.

Our issue area taxonomy was adapted from the PCS Taxonomy with definitions by the Foundation Center, which is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 4.0 International License.

Photos are licensed under Attribution Non Commercial 2.0 Generic Creative Commons license / Desaturated from original, and are credited to the following photographers:

Fondriest Environmental, David De Wit / Community Eye Health, Linda Steil / Herald Post, John Amis / UGA College of Ag & Environmental Sciences – OCCS, Andy B, Peter Garnhum, Thomas Hawk, 7ty9, Isriya Paireepairit, David Berger, UnLtd The Foundation For Social Entrepreneurs, Michael Dunne, Burak Kebapci, and Forrest Berkshire / U.S. Army Cadet Command public affairs

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Ra'ed Qutena, 段 文慶, Fabio Campo, City Clock Magazine, Justin Norman, scarlatti2004, Gary Simmons, Kathryn McCallum, and Nearsoft Inc

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Photo Credit: Kevork Djansezian via Getty Images

Photo Credit: Sonia Narang